Rolling Stones - Let It Bleed: 50th Anniversary Edition Deluxe Boxset

Super-deluxe box set
Limited edition hand-numbered box set
2 x 180-gram LPs in stereo and mono with restored original album art
2 x SACDs in stereo and mono housed in custom 12” sleeve
7” single of “Honky Tonk Women”/ “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” in mono with original picture sleeve
80-page hardcover book with essay by David Fricke and never-before seen photos by Ethan Russell
Three 12”x12” hand-numbered, replica-signed lithographs printed on embossed archival paper, housed in foil-stamped envelope Full-colour (23 x 23) poster with restored art from original 1969 Decca package
Remastered audio by Bob Ludwig at Gateway Mastering
A landmark moment of the 1960s, that still resonates profoundly today. Originally released in 1969, Let It Bleed is regarded by critics and music fans as one of the best and most important rock albums of all time.
Features three of the band’s greatest songs – Gimmie Shelter, Midnight Rambler & the anthemic You Can’t Always Get What You Want Brian Jones performs on only two tracks: playing the autoharp on You Got the Silver, and percussion on Midnight Rambler – he was replaced by Mick Taylor during the recording, who plays guitar on two tracks – Country Honk and Live with Me, as well as on Honky Tonk Women (recorded during the Let It Bleed sessions).
Like Beggars Banquet the year before, the dominant influence was American roots music – drawing heavily from gospel (apparent in Gimmie Shelter and You Can’t Always Get What You Want), country music of Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers (Country Honk), Chicago blues (Midnight Rambler) and country rock on the title track. Recording for Let It Bleed began in earnest in February 1969, recorded mainly at Olympic Studios in London and was originally scheduled for release in July 1969. Although “Honky Tonk Women” was released as a single that month, the album itself suffered numerous delays and was eventually released in December 1969, after the band’s US tour.
The lyricism found on Let It Bleed is often noted for its violent and cynical undercurrents. Jann S. Wenner, in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview with Jagger, described the album’s songs as “disturbing” the scenery as “ugly” and asked Jagger if the Vietnam War played a role in the album’s worldview. Jagger said: “I think so. Even though I was living in America only part time, I was influenced. All those images were on television. Plus, the spill out onto campuses”.
The album cover shows a surreal sculpture designed by Robert Brownjohn. The cake was made by then-unknown cookery writer Delia Smith!
The cover for Let It Bleed was among the ten chosen by the Royal Mail for a set of “Classic Album Cover” postage stamps issued in January 2010.

Only around £125 :flushed:

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I love this album, but I already have the “mono” LP and stereo SACD, not sure I could justify 125 smackers for a deluxe set with no extra audio. Looks nice though.

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Wow, that does look tempting (my fav RS album), but that is quite a hefty price, esp having just ordered the Abbey Road box set - I’ll never be able afford a new TT at this rate!

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You gotta love ABKCO same old stuff (unlike the Beatles) nothing new here.

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There really is something quite obscene about the way record companies are targeting middle aged + men (in the main) with musical obsessions and too much money. £125? Utter madness.

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It’s not a compulsory purchase.

G

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