Sagging CB Olive rubber feet ( hint / tip )

The 40 years I’ve run my CB 72/HC/250 the rubber feet have compressed / collapsed / deteriorated 3x. Usually the 250 being the heaviest sags first, followed by the HC. So it gets that awkward sagging look.

So recently I thought I’d try the following variation. As each box requires 4 feet (total 12),
I bought 24 feet.

With the 250 , after replacing the 4 screwed-in feet, I attached two more feet adjacent to each of the fixed feet (forming a triangle in each corner). So 12 feet under the 250.

With the HC, after replacing the 4 screwed-in feet, I attached another foot adjacent to each of the fixed feet. So 8 feet under the HC.

The 72 I just put 4 new feet, as this box rarely sags with age.

Hopefully this should alleviate the onset of sagging of my Naims for a longer period.

Regards from Perth Australia.

IIRC, Naim replace the feet as part of a service.

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Class A replace the Rubber Feet, during a service - they are listed on their paperwork.

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They do and I have bought them directly from Darran too in the past.

I’m pleased to report that I don’t have saggy feet.

And, last I checked, the rubber ones on the Naim boxes looked pretty good too!

Incidentally, the feet on the CDS2 are hard metal, not rubber.

Does anyone know why this should be? I may have known once but, if so, I’ve forgotten now. Does the CDS mechanism need to be more solidly ‘planted’ compared to the other boxes?

Believe all the Naim CD players have metal feet. My CDX2 does… :astonished:

All the mass loaded boxes do, apparently:

My CD5 is on rubber feet. Clearly the poor relation :wink:

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If you need rubber feet or just about anything else look up a company in the USA McMaster Carr. They have a paper catalog that s 6 inches thick. They have nothing to do with audio but if you need just about anything else check them out.

When my chrome bumper amps were serviced they replaced the rubber feet. They were serviced by focal Deutschland or music line in Germany

My Naim boxes sit on granite shelves, not the tempered glass of a Fraim. It worked well but we got a small uplift from putting HRS Nimbus Assemblies (I.e. rubbery feet) under the boxes, leaving the real feet in mid-air. I don’t know if they work equally well with other shelving of course, but it’s another option and free to try.

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The feet on our slimline Olive boxes went squishy and manky. So when I rested them on the beige carpet in the lounge, they left black marks (four per box, three boxes). My DB was not amused! Multiple applications of carpet cleaner have reduced the marks but failed to get rid of them completely.

I got that from the NAPSC of my old 82. The same little dots from Amazon that sorted the lid on my LP12 fixed this, but not until after we had marked the carpet.

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My long departed Olive 250 left not only happy memories but also 4 circular yellowy foot marks on one of my Isoblue shelves :slightly_frowning_face:

You can probably live with it on a shelf (covered by another amp) but I would respectfully submit that the middle of the lounge carpet is a different matter! :grinning:

“Strong words” were spoken!!

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They’re similar to the ones on my Meridian 200 and 208 CD players where a couple of the feet have gone “gooey”.

Yeah, We’ve got a Meridian 200 series setup in the dining room, that I really need to strip down and clean/refurbish. Along with the gooey feet, the front panels took repeated hits from the “pee” end of our beloved (yes, really :grin: ) Burmese kitty, Zebedee (a frequent contributor to the “Pets” thread up until last April).

Many of those very small buttons are gunked up with solidified p……, umm OK, perhaps we don’t need to go any further on a family friendly forum.

When rubber vulcanizes, the oil leeches out and does that. Some materials fare better like cork but eventually, unless metal or ceramic everything will do this.

I don’t have a single shelf without permanent feet marks.

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