The Turning Point, by Steve Cutts

Cheers.

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I’m not sure the article is talking about myths … just manufactured arguments for the sake of the article.

Well, it’s an opinion.

From my experience with politicians, entrepreneurs, senior executives and medium technical cadres, I do believe the article refutes with evidence-based facts and arguments some widely maintained myths, with bases often spurious and others for lack of information and/or knowledge of reality. On the other hand, it also refutes some other myths based on technooptimism and hypertechnology, as we were able to read on Dyson and the electric car’s thread.

In any case, the purpose of this thread, always within the Forum rules and as long as “authority” allows, is only to open a small window to consciousness, and to provide data and arguments about that part of reality that is increasingly looming over all of us and that many do not want to see and/or prefer to distort to bring it closer and stick it to their mental schemes. And also, of course, to see how long it endures without falling prey to discord, confrontation and blaming and personal discussion.

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Though, as bad as the bush fires are this image is entirely un-factual and extremely misleading, so not particularly useful as far as the topic goes. It’s been de-bunked on a good article on the BBC news web page. Additionally, the current bush fire season is well short of the worst in Australian history, both in lives lost and areas burnt - again discussed in a good BBC article.

Most of this climate stuff, in NZ and Australia at least, is largely governed by sea temperatures. Currently there is this thing with the cold and warm half of the Indian Ocean leading to a prolonged drought in Australia. In New Zealand the Pacific Ocean is in a neutral state, so no major summer storms at the moment. But we have had some terrible summer storms over the last few decades, as has Australia. It’s just as likely that the ocean currents and temperatures in the Indian Ocean will change again, and Australia will go through a period of extreme floods again. But ocean temperatures and currents, ebb and flow, such is the nature of these things. And human activity has little impact. But we should be good guardians of the planet anyway, because it’s the right thing to do.

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Cycles yes. But also a trend. A clear 1.5 degrees celsius since the 1940s. The current Australian weather conditions are unprecedented.

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Yes, but the timeline is too short to be meaningful. This is the inter-glacial trends based on fossilised forests in New Zealand. A higher world peak of temperatures 150,000 years ago, and we are in the next inter-glacial peak.

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The graph I’ve just shown you is out-of-date. “Current levels” are now off the top of the graph.

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I’m not really familiar with the Carbon Dioxide science. Really, because I’m in the good stewardship side of environmentalism, rather than the current climate crisis doom and gloom hysteria and everything that goes with it.

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“good stewardship”?

6.3 million hectares burnt, and Australia is not even into the what is traditionally the worst part of the fire season. A significant percentage of the forests of the Great Dividing Range is burnt. That’s pretty-much where all the forests are, and they’re mostly gone. A billion animals dead. It is unprecedented. Mercifully fewer human fatalities than in previous disasters, true.

Life is too short to debate climate change deniers. We’re done here.

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That’s disappointing, I had posted a graphic showing evidence for climate change, so I’m not sure how that translates to “climate change denier”. I expect that we both agree that there is climate change, though may differ over the degree that it is attributable to natural cycles and human activity. I expect that we both agree that we should protect our environment, I’ve dedicated my working career to it.

Here is the BBC article I was thinking off https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-50951043?app=news.world.australia.story.50951043.page

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117 million hectares in 1974, when the mean temperature was below the average in your chart.

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Yesterday, in rural Berkshire it was over 10 degrees centigrade , if that isn’t indicative of a climate that is askew …

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You’re not entitled to your own facts. There are a total of 134 million hectares of forest in Australia.

https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/forestsaustralia/australias-forests

You’re not seriously suggesting that around 90% of this burnt in one year, are you?

I’m getting 95M. The vast majority in NT, SA and WA.

Well, there are lots of reasons to sound the alarm, but yeah in term of nationwide total areas burnt, the current fires haven’t yet burnt a comparable area in parts of the country.

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