Where have all the Statesman and Stateswomen gone

#1

Where have all the Statesman and Stateswomen gone.

Don’t know about you but I’m a little feed up with the quality of political leaders we all seem to have at present. Both left and right.

We have (NSW, Australia) a river system that’s dying, we’re already the driest continent on earth and just had our hottest month ever, doesn’t take genus to work out what’s going on. All this just to grow crops (or stock) that clearly can’t be supported. Massive fish kills, huge Murray Cod dead and dying enough to make the toughest bushie cry. True it’s not helped by a crippling drought but lack of leadership from our politicians is staggering. Most people think they simply take too much water from the system, each state doing its own thing.

Failing to comprehend this isn’t being a climate denier it’s sticking your head in the sand. Call it global warming or anything you like, to me it’s just about respect and taking care of what we have. These clowns get influenced by lobby groups that really are only motivated by self interest.

It’s simple.

Single use plastic could be banned overnight. Industry adapts, their not that stupid just greedy and lazy.

Until we have leaders that govern for us rather than please their own parties or factions we’ll all suffer in the name of some stupid long forgotten ideal. I’ve always thought that most people couldn’t give a toss about the parties ideology, most are centralists or moderates. They just want a fair go and expect politicians to behave like adults, protect us and our environment.

Years ago you probably could have voted as our parents did without too much thought, safe cause then neither left or right was fringe. These days you can’t be so sure.

So, where have all the Statesmen and/or Stateswomen gone. People that want to make a difference, who’s goal isn’t just wealth and self interest.

If you know of one I’d love to know who and why.

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#2

Lately I have been impressed by Emmanuel Macron. Cuts a fine figure of a man. Recent choice with a more environmentally concerned output has put the french rioting in the streets. Make of that as you will ?

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#3

I have this funny feeling (well, it’s not funny at all in fact) that I don’t think you are going to get (m)any positive responses to that question. Simply because there aren’t any !

It’s the same here in the UK, I asked this at work last week. The list included Boris, Davis, Raab, Corbyn…No! I said, this is not Comedy Relief Week. The USA is on the global stage every day for the wrong reasons (something to do with orange hair !) Even Canadians aren’t entirely convinced they have it much better. Venezuela ? great choice of two ? JC Junkers, Macron ? I give up !

There aren’t any.

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#4

Populism isnt the answer. It’s the problem, I would rather someone who does what’s right even if it maybe unpopular rather than an easy fix for the sake of a few votes.

But I take your point.

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#5

the question of ‘leadership’ I believe is at the heart of a lot of issues that we face today. with good leadership, I don’t believe we would have had a Brexit referendum. the danger with lack of leadership is that something else fills the vacuum – and we already see signs of that all over… I suspect we may be in for some tricky times where identity politics takes over

sigh…
/ken

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#6

Looking at Europe and North America only, one could, paradoxically and controversially, construct an argument nominating Putin as the most successful of the current crop of political leaders. There is no doubt that he has dragged Russia out of the mire and has re-established the nation as a major international player politically, economically and militarily. I say paradoxically because (imho), he doesn’t display any of traits (e.g. honesty, integrity, empathy, flexibility) that are usually associated with good leadership. I say controversially, because some of Russia’s actions/behaviour (e.g. annexation of Crimea, suppression of internal dissent, corrupt judiciary, assassination of opponents) are not regarded as norms of good leadership. Putin’s internal popularity ratings are generally high, but in a one party system it would be abnormal were that not the case - however, his ratings are widely regarded as (mostly) genuine. I will leave it to the reader to decide whether his undoubted success as Russia’s leader can/should be regarded as “statesmanlike”.

Political leadership in the Western European powers (i.e. GB, France, Germany) is currently conspicuous by its absence (imho). A deeper analysis of that statement is too long an essay for this thread.

Regarding GB specifically; Firstly, it seems to me that too many of our political class are too distant from the electorate resulting in many recent party leaders (of all persuasions) being too busy with their own agendas to notice that their flocks have been steadily decreasing. Secondly, a basic tenet of political leadership is putting public duty ahead of personal interest, but (it seems to me, at least) that too many of our leaders are/were in politics for personal gain or just to play the game (e.g. Blair, Clegg, Cameron, Osborne).

On the other hand, it is often said that we get the politicians we deserve, so maybe changes in society’s popular beliefs and attitudes mitigate against producing the individual(s) we seek and simply deliver the ones we have? Or maybe those high performing exceptional individuals that we desire only come along once in a generation, as in many non-political arenas?

Finally on a personal note (FWIW), my political heroes are Margaret Thatcher and Winston Churchill and I have long believed that benevolent dictatorship is the best form of government - the challenge is preventing benevolent from becoming malevolent. If you have read this far, well done!

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#7

It is a matter of time until we reach this state - a rapper as president:

… from the best b-movie ever …

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#9

A benevolent dictator could well decide to consult the population he rules over …

FWIW, I fully, completely and totally supported the holding of the referendum, even though I believe it to have been 14 years too late …

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#10

And just because he does consult the population he can choose to ignore it’s response, and often does. eg when about a quarter of the population votes in favour of something (can’t imagine what, for the moment) he chooses to ignore the other three quarters if it suites her/him.

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#11

Absolutely. He could …

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#12

Got a funny feeling (ok it’s not at all funny) that most of us know just what it’s like having a dictator in charge, but not necessarily a benevolent one.

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#13

Most? Are you sure … if so how?

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#14

67m - 17m = 50m

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#15

I thought so …

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#16

You should visit the “Brain Teaser” thread more often :sunglasses:

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#17

Vince Cable for Fuhrer!

You’re lucky you don’t feel constrained by logic.

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#18

Logic? I fear a lot of the arguments surrounding Brexit are less guided by “logic” - instead largely by “sentiment”… and we all know from history to where this can lead…
enjoy/ken

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#19

Great statesmen? Surely you need look no further than the Marmalade Moron. Or the outstanding leaders he most admires: Vlad the Impaler, Bolsonaro, Lil Kim, Duterte…

And he’ll be meddling in a democracy near you any day now.

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#20

For the next wannabe fuhrer you need look no further than Farrage, the parallels are falling into place. Actually he looks to be channeling Mao as well except he doesn’t feel the need to do most of the walking himself.

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#21

If Bono ran as the President of the United States Of Britire. I would vote for him.

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