Word of the day/week

Kakistocracy. Under forum rules I am not allowed to offer any meaning.

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I am pretty sure Suzie Dent has posted this as her word of the day at some point. And If not, I am sure she will at some point.

What a great word, and we experience the impact every day. Before I looked it up I thought it would be about poo.

A minister used "navvy gravvy” on the Today programme on Weds morning.

Susie Dent later said it is ‘used in the dockyards, it means a very small amount.’ I would love the interviewer to have questioned the minister on what it means and where he knew it from. The use of the phrase was certainly more interesting than anything else he said :-)))

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APRICITY

the warmth of the sun in winter

Apricity means “the warmth of the sun in winter.” If you live where parkas and scarves are the norm for the months of the winter season, you come to understand the apricity of a day that provides a drink of brilliant sunshine that warms you despite being surrounded by ice and snow.

Apparently (allegedly) doesn’t appear in any other language apart from British English

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Kakistocracy
Ahh yes the Peter Principle in action.

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Clenched is a word that’s dominated my thoughts so far this week.

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So you could have a navvy gravvy of navy gravy. No wonder people find English hard to learn.

rhinocerotic is a long term favourite of mine.

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That seems very relevant to the world we live in today…:face_with_diagonal_mouth:

Bums.

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Petrichor.

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Grok

“to understand intuitively or by empathy, to establish rapport with”

My wife used this in convo with one of my kids in the car earlier and I was like “WTF does that mean?!”. Apparently its common lingo, I’ve never heard it until today.

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Empathy, unfortunately hardly ever used these days.

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Moisture.

Preferably said out loud like how David Bellamy would say it.

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Susurrus - soft or low noise. One of those words suggestive of its meaning.

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