Glasses cleaning wipes

Anyone got any recommendations for these?

As anyone wearing glasses knows, there is a big difference in vision clarity between ‘clean’ and really clean!

I had been using the Zeiss ones for years but the quality is poor these days, either bone dry out of the sachet and/or leaving smears and residue on my lenses. Have tried a couple of others recently including ‘Alibeiss’ from the river, but none seem as good as how the Zeiss ones used to be.

Especially noticeable at the moment when I have to wipe my glasses over two or three times when entering commercial premises in a mask. Have to go back to contacts at this rate!

These Lidl wipes are the Dogs Danglies. I use them on my camera lenses. (and my specs)

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I use Astonish window cleaner sprayed on to some kitchen towel.

Big fan of breathing on them (in the mouth both sides at once technique) then using the lower edge of my t-shirt, esp now that office gear has been shorts & t-shirt since March. Just make sure the shirt is cotton and not a synthetic cycling or jogging top.

Wipes are ok but they do tend to evaporate before the job is done, and it’s not practical to always have one to hand.

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These seem to do the job, but I always do my phone with them after the glasses… VFM and all that. not cheap, but smear free. Happy hunting.

Mr Muscle Glass Cleaner on kitchen towel.

+1 for Clearwipe

Hahaha I’m telling yer, T-Cut is coming next

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I find lathering my hands with some soap and warm water and rubbing the lens between my fingers with a quick rinse and dry off is sufficient.

Saves on waste with disposable wipes.

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My wife has forbidden the use of any disposable wipes - not good for environment apparently, whether ending up in drains or landfill

Bit of soap and water if very dirty, but usually a microfibre e-cloth for glass and chrome, available from your local supermarket. It’s a big yellow lint free cloth, but can’t remember the make, sorry!

I’m a daily soap & warm water fan & dry off with e-cloth.
In between a huff breath & clean handkerchief.

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I developed this technique in the 90s when working in hot and sweaty locations.
I rinse the lenses under flowing water, gently carressing the lens with my fingers (ie not rubbing hard - just the fingers float over the glass surface)

I use the hotel hair shampoo and drop a small amount on the concave surface of the lens, I then gently caress with my clean fingers on both the front and back of the lens and rinse the shampoo and water of the lens continue to gentle caressing the glass surface. Throughly rinse the lens in running warm water ((not hot)). Then I use a kleenex tissue to mop the water off the lens - there should be no need to wipe the lens. The kleenex tissue should not contain any oils.
I hold up the lenses to the light to check that all the smears have been removed, if not I repeat the process.

This way I get clean lenses with no smears.

For the last 8 years I have had no need to wear glasses as I have plastic lenses inserted to replace cataract damaged lenses. However I do use the same technique on my computer lenses but not frequently as I am no long sighted when at the computer and so do not get impacted by the dirt on the computer glasses.

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When I wore glasses permanently, I would breethe on them and use my shirt tails. Worked very effectively and I guess I did several times an hour becaise I couldn’t stand them dirty (being short-sighted I could see any marks on them). In those days the lenses were made of glass, with no coatings, so no risk of scratching or removing coating. At the age of about 14 I had decided I hated glasses so much that I stopped wearing them, and went through the rest of my school years having to sit at the front to see the blackboard (called that because it was black, not called a chalkboard because it wasn’t made of chalk). For other things like going to the cinema I had to pull the corners of my eyes to bring the screen into some semblence of focus: but better than wearing hateful glasses. Then I discovered contact lenses, and have been wearing them ever since.

Cleaning is a rub with a few drops of Bausch & Lomb Boston contact lens cleaner and put it in the same brand soaking solution overnight – otherwise normal tears and blinking keep them clean! And they never mist up when coming in from the cold! Unfortunately in the recent past I have had to start using reading glasses for either very small print or reading in dim light, especially when my eyes are tired. I still hate the things, but at least now with plastic lenses they are lighter in weight, and I only have to wear for short periods. To clean them I breathe on them and use a microfibre cloth. Occasionally if they are greasy I wash them with soap and water and rinse under the tap, dabbing dry with a tissue or absorbent kitchen paper, and if necessary polish with a microfibre cloth.With camera lenses I try to avoid ever touching the glass, so most of the time only a blower brush is needed to remove specks of dust. In the unfortunate event of a fingerprint I use the breath and microfibre cloth approach - I am wary of cleaning liquids, and indeed wary of rubbing the lens with anything unless absolutely essential because the coatings can be damaged.

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Have been using this for around a year or so now,still a third full,excellent stuff.

There used to be a great product called Cleresite which was made in Canada from eucalyptus oil which stopped fogging. Has anyone seen this recently? I last saw it about 10 years ago and miss it.

Wet cleaning in an attempt to avoid scratching. I used to use washing up liquid until it was pointed out that most contain glycerine so smears, and apparently messes up some coatings. If you can get Teepol then that is I believe just detergent.
If in the bathroom I find dearly beloved’s Boots Foaming Tea Tree facial wash efficient at moving grease and for a while anti-misting.

I use e-cloths designed to clean glassware.
Now that my lenses can be popped out cleaning is easier.

I use a spray-on cleaning fluid supplied by
Leightons. Use a soft cleaning cloth supplied by Leightons to gently rub the fluid dry. Removes dirt, grease and smears easily.