Show us your flowers πŸ’

My knowledge of moss/lichen is limited but the PictureThis app may yield answers otherwise other members are welcome to chime in. I was in the opposite camp to you: I wanted to remove the unsightly accumulation whereas my wife found it to be natural. She won me over in the end and I’m glad I listened to her deliberations. Here is an example where moss/lichen balls add to the accoutrement :relaxed:

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Those moss balls are impressive, as is the rest of your garden.

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Looks like a type of Allium, member of the onion family….pretty.

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Thank you for your kind words, however it is not my garden but rather an exhibit from the Chelsea Flower Show. Those moss balls are indeed impressive and I thought they looked beautiful growing on the rocks around the pond. It has inspired me to try and recreate something similar around my pond: a waterfall with a bridge leading to the tea house.

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He can’t respond. He has already reached the Satori level of consciousness.

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You have there an agapanthus; having averaged about 150 a year for the past decade, this summer we had 336 following an unusually wet spring here in Canberra. In the interests of fresh air, exercise and arithmetic, my son has been tasked with counting them every year since he was 4; this year he was 15 and appalled by the scale of the task!

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Yet another beautiful iris:

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A sea of creeping buttercups:

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Cow parsley.
They all had a good run this year around my area. What with a late spring and very dull and wet may.
They all lasted much longer than usual, although now after the latest run of hot sunny days have lost their charms.

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A long stretch of road can look spectacular when the cow parsley is in full bloom and it’s nice to see it adorning so many country lanes.

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I think that is what dad called Stinking Bill, his corruption of Sweet William, a kind of Dianthus

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Yes you are right, the picture angle fooled me.

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Yes, our local council have started a policy of no cutting until August (except junctions) I have to say it will probably upset a few, but the acres of cow parsley have been a joy.

A few years ago I had lunch with a Green councillor (we have three) and he told me, they were absolutely delighted as a rare orchid had been found growing as a result.

The press were not informed in order for it to be kept a secret

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I love the colour of this clematis:

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It looks like an agapanthus to me.

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Peony - taken a few weeks ago. It took a couple of years for the first bloom to appear after planting the second bloom appeared for the first time last year. A beautiful flower but only lasts for a short period of time. A favorite of my wife, although she loves all flowers…

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I’m inclined to support agapanthus.
If you do a search for that and allium, find a sharp picture, both have globe shaped flowerheads. The agapanthus has six point trumpet shaped florets and the anther is like a β€˜T’ stroke across the top of the filament. Allium tend to have a star like florets and the anthers are more ball like.

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This is me being arty with a photo of cow parsley from the glorious May of last year .

I like photos where there are just one or two colours

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Not from my garden but from a public space up at the Conservatory at Volunteer Park in Seattle. At times I like to use my monochrome camera to capture images.

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Clematis just coming into bloom, at least 10 days late this year in the UK.

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