Supernait 3, strange overheat

Hi @Vaggoz

The above links to the same issue I had with my SN3, back in September 2020.
Turned out I had a MM cartridge but my phonostage set to MC.

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Thank you for your response but in my case everything is set right, phono settings, cables, etc.

I asked a while ago if you could take picture of the solder joins in the banana plugs.
That would help determine connectivity looking at the colour of the joint.

In mechanical terms, there are 3 or 4 hex head machine screws on the bottom that clamp the metal inner chassis (to which the ceramic heat-pads are attached…and the output devices are bolted to these ceramic insulators) to the outer case. These bottom screws thermally couple the outer aluminum case cover (which is substantial at like 5mm-7mm thick of solid aluminum), to the inner metal chassis, through mechanical compression.

If any of these screws are even slightly loose, that would be very bad and could easily cause issues like the OP describes.

NOTE: Absolutely none of these things I have described are user-serviceable. The best course in this case, with available info, is to have this amp serviced by a Naim-authorized dealer or service center.

Just spoke to my dealer, he told me that the obvious reason for the overheating was that the sn3 couldn’t provide the demanding power in certain frequency range (low frequencies in my case) to the Ovators.
So to protect itself from overheating due to it’s inability to drive the speakers in such frequencies it shut down.
Also i checked the woofers if they rumble & not such thing exists even when i cranked the volume up to 11 o’clock.
So the combination of the hungry for power Ovators & the demanding low frequency of the d&b records probably caused the overheating.

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I’m not sure whether your Goldnote Phono stage is IEC or RIAA, but it looks quite configurable, in which case try setting it to IEC as this should include the subsonic frequency cut over RIAA and usually cures the subsonic issues I mention in my earlier post above.

Note that you don’t really hear subsonics, but they sap huge amounts of power from the amp and with prolonged play can trigger a shutdown like you experienced.

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Something has changed OP says he’s had this setup for four years and this is the first time it’s happened.
Everything works fine until it doesn’t.
I’ve said all along amps don’t get hot until they meet resistance either a bad load or a poor connection.
Good Luck.

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Calm down mate, i am not ignoring you.
I will check the connections once i have the time to do & upload photos.

The ph-10 has 6 curves two RIAA, two Deca London & two Columbia.
No subsonic filter to all of them.

That may well be the source of the issue. If you play some vinyl with some subsonic issues - warps, even slight ones are notorious here, but I have a handful that are dead flat but can demonstrate subsonic noise very well - then it can make the amp work very hard, to the point of getting hot and even shutting down. IEC EQ phono stages are much better here than RIAA as IEC includes a subsonic filter. However, note that compliance issues between the cartridge and the tonearm can exacerbate subsonic problems…

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I don’t believe is a compliance issue since tt, cartridge & tonearm is made from the same manufacturer (clearaudio).

I agree. I just mentioned it to be thorough about the issue.

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Here are the photos of the banana plugs going to the Ovators. First photo the left speaker


@Vaggoz
Hi
Thanks for taking the trouble to post the pictures.
They don’t look good at all it looks like the inner stranding is rather oxidised and the idea of trying to solder screw fit plugs isn’t good.
I don’t like that type of Banana as they don’t seem to retain a tight fit in the socket.
I’m sorry to be so negative but I couldn’t have that at all.
I prefer the proper Naim and Deltron pins they keep their tension much longer and I find they have a more robust surface area contact.
Below is a picture of what properly soldered Naim pins look like for either heatshrinking or for Naim sockets use SA8 plugs.
I use Naim and Deltron the pin arrangement is the same mine below that.
Perhaps this might not cure a problem without closer inspection and hands on but it could only be better.
IMG_7071

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I totally agree with you, i didn’t like how it looked from day one, but since it performed great with no issues for about 8 months now even at higher volumes i strongly believe this is not the cause of the problem.
Would you believe me if i tell that my dealer has ordered the naim plugs fot the Ovators on August 2023 & the official dealer doesn’t bother to get them even after numerous calls my dealer made to him.
Market in Greece is sh☆t ( excuse my language).

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Naim do a special version of their plugs for Ovators, so I would be tempted to use those, as long as you can get them soldered by someone who can do it properly. I’m not a fan of those Z-plugs, I’d use proper bananas every time, although I’d be surprised if they were the cause of your overheating problem.

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I hope you get sorted out it could just be that those Z plugs are a bit loose or corroded.
Hollow plugs like that don’t have much strength for good surface area contact.
You will know better how they feel in the socket it’s a hands on diagnosis to try and help.
Best wishes and look forward to any findings you might get. :+1:t2:

May i ask a question:
If someone decides to use the Ovators with another brand’s amplification, he must definitely use the nacA5 cable or can use any other cable???
From what i have read the restrictions of using the nacA5 refer mostly for a Naim amp protection.
Am i right?

This is right it’s best recommended at certain lengths for the amplifier.
Other types can be used but some types out of usual spec should be avoided.
I use Kudos KS1 with my SN3. :+1:t2:

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Therein lays your problem - that is no where near good enough, sorry to say. When you get the cables done properly i think you will be amazed at how ‘right’ everything will sound & perform.

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