What are you preparing for dinner tonight?

Because those of us born and bred in Devon know how to make a cream tea properly.

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Yes but why does it have to be in that order. Not being a smartass just curious.

Just makes it easier to have the thick cream on the bottom and jam on top
Also the cream keeps the jam from sliding off

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It’s funny some people get all caught up it what’s proper and what’s not. Obviously we’re upside down here and put the jam first. But I certainly would go to war over it. :grin:

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It very well could be that the cream was closer to the person putting in on

It’s one of those daft issues that raise inter county ire to an unbelievable extent. Wars have been started for less. The Cornish put the jam on first. Across the Tamar in Devon the cream is applied first and woe betide anyone who gets it wrong as the National Trust discovered a few years ago when they posted a photo of a cream tea served at a Cornish Trust property with the jam on top. They were inundated with complaints.

And just don’t go there with whether scone rhymes with “bone” or “gone” :smiley:

You don’t jam your toast and then butter it. For me, the cream is a pseudo butter layer and therefore comes before the jam🤷🏻‍♂️

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I take a bite and tbh I couldn’t tell you what’s on the bottom or the top. To me what’s really important is a good scone and the best quantity cream and jam.

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Oh we are onto serious territory here …

Yippee. It’s pork chop Thursday today.
Using my trusty roasting contraption.
Will think about a carb addition later, or maybe just keep it keto.

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That’s an interesting contraption.
Where did you get it and what else is it useful for please…:thinking:

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Toast :wink:

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:roll_eyes: :man_facepalming:t4:

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It’s quite an adaptable technique.
Fitting in my le creuset 27 you can put the lid on it and slow roast, then take the lid off. Turn the oven up high to shortly crisp up the crackling.
I prefer to first put it in uncovered at a very high heat and then low and slow. Although I like to use the other shoulder end of the pork side for chops if you can get a butcher to cut it.

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Oh yes.

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Funnily enough, that’s what I cooked for dinner last night, as always, using your top tip for roasting.

I do it slightly differently, carefully scoring the rind into bite sized pieces, and then sealing the chop on the hob, before introducing it to Mr. toast rack.

Then it’s into the oven for about fifteen minutes, where it meets its new best friends, the Hasselback Potato gang.

100%, the best ever pork chops. :yum: :yum:

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We are off to try out friend’s new pool and have al fresco lunch
They are promising oysters and champagne
Our rather modest contribution is this salmon and asparagus quiche

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Not dinner just a snack. Fresh sourdough butter and a smeg of Vegemite. Heaven.

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